15 12, 2023

What to Do if You Are Waitlisted – Ivy League College Admissions

By |2023-12-15T12:34:29-05:00December 15th, 2023|College Admissions, Early Action, Early Decision, Harvard, Ivy Leage Admissions, Ivy League Advice, Ivy League College, Waitlisted|0 Comments

What to Do if You Are Waitlisted – Ivy League College Admissions

Letter of Continued Interest: The College Waitlist

What to do if you are waitlisted?  College waitlists can be a frustrating experience for students. After putting in countless hours of hard work on their college applications, being put on a waitlist can feel like rejection. However, being waitlisted is not necessarily the end of the road. In fact, there are steps  students (i.e. YOU)  can take right now to increase your chances of getting off the waitlist and accepted — one of which is to write a letter of continued interest.

A letter of continued interest is exactly what it sounds like – a letter that expresses continued interest in attending a particular college or university.

It is a way for students to update the admissions committee on any new (read: impressive) developments since they submitted their application the first time, as well as reiterate their desire and commitment to attend the school if allowed to attend.

Here are some tips on how to write a good or effective letter of continued interest, and yes, it is something you should absolutely do. ++ I help with these letters for a flat rate of $150, if you want to contact me directly via the contact info at the top of my website: www.IvyCollegeEssay.com

 

Now, here is how to write your letter of continued interest:

1. Keep it concise and to the point

Admissions committees are busy and have a lot of applications to review, so it’s important to keep your letter brief and to the point. Start with a short introduction and then get straight to the updates you want to share. Make sure you express your continued interest in attending the school, but avoid repeating information that was already included in your original application. Your letter should not be more than 1 page, and ideally, not more than 1-2 paragraphs tops.

2. Highlight any new accomplishments or achievements

This is important!  Since submitting your application, have you won any awards, received any special recognition, or taken on any new leadership roles? Use your letter of continued interest to highlight these accomplishments and explain how they demonstrate your continued commitment to your education and personal growth.

3. Be specific about why you want to attend the school

Use your letter of continued interest as an opportunity to reaffirm why you want to attend the school in question. Be specific about what draws you to the school and what you hope to gain from your education there. Do some research on the school’s programs, faculty, and resources, and use this information to tailor your letter to the specific school.

4. Show enthusiasm and passion

Admissions committees want to see that you are truly excited about the prospect of attending their school. Use your letter to demonstrate your enthusiasm and passion for your field of study and your desire to learn and grow as a student. Be genuine in your tone and avoid sounding too rehearsed or formulaic.

5. Follow up appropriately. Appropriately being the key word!

After you’ve sent your letter of continued interest, it’s important to follow up ONLY if you have additional, significant updates since your last letter. Be mindful of the admissions committee’s time however as more than 2 letters post-waitlist, unless you’ve published a book, or won the Noble Prize is really being too aggressive. The adcom is BUSY.  We all know you want to go to your targeted school more than anything, but don’t be too desperate — as in dating, it will get you rejected.

In conclusion, being waitlisted can be a disappointing experience, but it’s important to remember that it’s not the end of the road.

By writing a well-crafted letter of continued interest, you can increase your chances of getting accepted off the waitlist and ultimately achieving your goal of attending your desired school. Keep these tips in mind when crafting your letter, and remember to be genuine, passionate, and specific in your communication. Good luck!

[Want more help with your letter or your college application essays in general?  Contact me for a free consultation today at www.IvyCollegeEssay.com and get into the school of your dreams!]

Check out these other blog articles as well:

  1. How to Get Off Harvard’s Waitlist
  2. Want to Transfer to an Ivy League College — There’s Still Hope!
  3. The Best Ivy League College Admissions Blog
6 05, 2023

How to Write Letter of Continued Interest (LOCI)

By |2024-01-24T19:19:35-05:00May 6th, 2023|College Admissions, Deferred, Ivy League Advice, Letter of Continued Interest, LOCI, Waitlisted|0 Comments

How to Write Letter of Continued Interest (LOCI)

Being deferred from your college of choice, or being put on the waitlist can be a frustrating experience for students. After putting in countless hours of hard work and dedication towards their college applications, being put on a waitlist can feel like a rejection. However, being waitlisted is not necessarily the end of the road. In fact, there are steps that students can take to increase their chances of getting accepted off the waitlist, one of which is writing a letter of continued interest.

A letter of continued interest is exactly what it sounds like – a letter that expresses continued interest in attending a particular college or university.

It is a way for students to update the admissions committee on any new developments since they submitted their application, as well as reiterate their desire to attend the school. Here are some tips on how to write a good or effective letter of continued interest:

1. Keep it concise and to the point

Admissions committees are busy and have a lot of applications to review, so it’s important to keep your letter brief and to the point. Start with a short introduction and then get straight to the updates you want to share. Make sure you express your continued interest in attending the school, but avoid repeating information that was already included in your original application. Your letter should not be more than 1 page, and ideally, not more than 1-2 paragraphs tops.

2. Highlight any new accomplishments or achievements

Since submitting your application, have you won any awards, received any special recognition, or taken on any new leadership roles? Use your letter of continued interest to highlight these accomplishments and explain how they demonstrate your continued commitment to your education and personal growth.

3. Be specific about why you want to attend the school

Use your letter of continued interest as an opportunity to reaffirm why you want to attend the school in question. Be specific about what draws you to the school and what you hope to gain from your education there. Do some research on the school’s programs, faculty, and resources, and use this information to tailor your letter to the specific school.

4. Show enthusiasm and passion

Admissions committees want to see that you are truly excited about the prospect of attending their school. Use your letter to demonstrate your enthusiasm and passion for your field of study and your desire to learn and grow as a student. Be genuine in your tone and avoid sounding too rehearsed or formulaic.

5. Follow up appropriately. Appropriately being the key word!

After you’ve sent your letter of continued interest, it’s important to follow up ONLY if you have additional, significant updates since your last letter. Be mindful of the admissions committee’s time however as more than 2 letters post-waitlist, unless you’ve published a book, or won the Noble Prize is really being too aggressive. The adcom is BUSY.  We all know you want to go to your targeted school more than anything, but don’t be too desperate — as in dating, it will get you rejected.

In conclusion, being waitlisted can be a disappointing experience, but it’s important to remember that it’s not the end of the road.

By writing a well-crafted letter of continued interest, you can increase your chances of getting accepted off the waitlist and ultimately achieving your goal of attending your desired school. Keep these tips in mind when crafting your letter, and remember to be genuine, passionate, and specific in your communication. Good luck!

[Want more help with your letter or more bespoke advice?  Contact me for a free consultation at www.IvyCollegeEssay.com and get into the school of your dreams!]

Check out these other blog articles as well:

  1. How to Get Off Harvard’s Waitlist
  2. Want to Transfer to an Ivy League College — There’s Still Hope!
  3. The Best Ivy League College Admissions Blog

 

 

10 09, 2022

What Does It Mean If You Get Waitlisted?

By |2022-10-01T14:40:52-04:00September 10th, 2022|college, College Admissions, Ivy League, Ivy League Advice, Ivy League College, Waitlisted|3 Comments

 What Does it Mean If You Get Waitlisted?

More importantly, is there anything that you can do?

Decision day comes and when you see that email from your dream school, you discover that you have been waitlisted. Ugh. Horrible. Blech. Depressing. Just not what you were hoping for at all.  But, while this may leave you with a sinking feeling in your stomach, don’t despair.  Really.

Keep in mind that the Ivy League and  “Top 20” universities in general are all EXTREMELY  competitive. Getting on the waitlist is an accomplishment in itself.

That doesn’t make you feel better does it?  It should, because it means that there is still hope.

I’ve seen many students who’ve been put on the waitlist for the upper-level Ivy League and Ivy League competitive schools. In other words, I’ve had students get OFF the waitlist, get OUT of limbo, and actually gain acceptance sometimes at the very last minute and to the elite of the Ivy League schools.  In other words, Princeton, Harvard, and Yale.  So, as they say, it really “ain’t over ’til it’s over” and you always need to keep the faith.

Here are some interesting facts to keep in mind:  around 10% of students are waitlisted each year and end up getting in and last year that percentage was high. Students are applying to more and more of the Ivy League colleges, so every year predicting the percentage of admitted students that actually matriculate is a moving target, especially when students gain admission to multiple universities.

IMPORTANT POINT:  You can be notified of admittance as early as April or as late as August depending on the school.

That said, you need to move forward though as if it’s not an option, but always keep that small light of hope in the back of your mind burning. Because really — you just don’t know how it will all turn out.  Some students even turn down Harvard for Princeton, Princeton for MIT, or Brown for Dartmouth, so you really just don’t know how many spaces might suddenly become open and when your name can suddenly come up.

In other words, don’t assume things are out of your hands. Transferring to an Ivy League college can also be an option, as colleges accept transfers after only one semester. So go ahead and enroll in your next best choice as the better the school, the stronger your chances of successfully transferring to the Ivy League (or Ivy League competitive school) the following year.

Write a Statement of Continuing Interest

Meanwhile, take the time to write the waitlisted school an email, adding on any new awards or honors you’ve won since your application, and state your interest that, if allowed off the waitlist, the school is your very first choice.

Waitlisted and want help developing a strategic plan of action now, moving forward?  See what my clients have to say about how I helped them not only get into a top Ivy League college like Harvard, Princeton, or Yale, but how I’ve helped them transfer into these schools as well   https://ivycollegeessay.com/testimonials/.

Also, read my post on “How to Transfer to the Ivy League” here: https://ivycollegeessay.com/2020/01/21/transferring-ivy-league-college-harvard/

Want more help?  Reach out now for a free consultation at: www.IvyCollegeEssay.com and let me help you achieve your dream of getting into the Ivy League!

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