7 11, 2022

Deferred From Early Decision?

By |2022-11-07T13:31:12-05:00November 7th, 2022|Brown, college, College Admissions, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Duke, Early Action, Early Decision, Harvard, Ivy League, Ivy League Advice, Ivy League College, MIT, NYU, Princeton, Stanford, UPenn, Waitlisted, Yale|0 Comments

Deferred from Early Decision or Early Action?

Have you been deferred from Early Decision or Early Action?  By now, everyone who was applying for college Early Decision for the Nov 1 deadline has gotten everything in and is in a holding pattern.  In other words: just waiting.

Some of you are already getting invitations for interviews, while others are sitting on their hands trying to not get too anxious while they wait it out for the one decision that could determine their entire future.

But, what if you don’t get rejected OR accepted for Early Decision or Early Action?

What if you get DEFERRED?

What does being “deferred” actually mean, and what everyone really wants to know:  what are your remaining chances?

Here’s the good news:  being deferred, while not the full-out acceptance you were looking for, is GOOD!

Take that in for a second — in lieu of a full-out acceptance from Harvard, Princeton, Stanford or MIT, being deferred is actually not a bad thing, and this is why:

Being deferred from college Early Decision or Early Action, especially when you’re talking about the Ivy League or Ivy League “equivalent” schools means you actually have what it takes.

In other words, it means you have what it takes to be competitive, not only at the Ivy League, but at that particular school.

That’s HUGE news if the college you applied to is in the top 20, let alone the top 10 or even top 3!

If Harvard defers you, that means the Harvard admissions committee thought you were good enough to put “on hold” for the moment, as they wait to compare you to the rest of the regular admissions applicants.

That’s what’s going on when you get deferred.  You are deemed “competitive” enough, because otherwise you would have been flat out rejected outright.  Admissions officers don’t need to make even more work for themselves.

The fact that you were NOT rejected though, means they thought you “competitive enough”.  That’s GREAT NEWS in terms of your opportunity.  It means regardless if you don’t get in to this particular school, you now know in your heart that you are at the level this TYPE of school is looking for, and you’re making the cut.

So, if you get deferred from Columbia, for example, that means that comparable level schools like Brown, Dartmouth, or UPenn might still find you interesting.

That means if you get deferred from Stanford, MIT just might want to snatch you up!

Don’t let a deferment dampen your spirits as though it’s not the ultimate that you were looking for, you are STILL IN THE RACE!

And, yes, that’s a race that you absolutely can still win.

I get many students into top Ivy League colleges every single year who were initially deferred.  Your hope is delayed, NOT shattered by any means.

So, what can you do if you get that deferment notice?  Contact me and let me help you navigate the new situation.  You have to know how to respond to a deferment properly (as in sending the “right” kind of follow up email),

AND, you need to now maximize your strategy for all of your other regular decision schools.

Want more information?  Contact me today for a free consultation.  I’m a former Harvard admissions interviewer + Harvard graduate and run the award-winning Ivy League College Admissions Firm: www.IvyCollegeEssay.com

Contact me today, and get into the school of your dreams!

You might also like to read these articles here on my blog:

14 09, 2022

How To Get In to an Ivy League College (Tips for Parents!)

By |2022-10-01T14:22:25-04:00September 14th, 2022|Brown, College Admissions, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Ivy League, Ivy League Advice, Ivy League College, Princeton, UPenn, Yale|5 Comments

The Parent’s Guide to Getting Your Student In to the Ivy League

Parents want their children to do well in life, and if you have always dreamed of having your son or daughter graduate from an Ivy League college — which, to define the term “Ivy League,” refers to the eight schools that make up “The Ivies” and includes: HarvardPrinceton, Yale (the “Big Three”), as well as Brown, Dartmouth, Cornell, Columbia, and Penn (The University of Pennsylvania),  there are many thing you can do that will help your student succeed in the college admissions and Ivy League college admissions process, in particular.

#1.  Make sure your student takes as many AP courses as possible:  

College admissions officers, especially at the most competitive schools, want to see that your student is not only challenging themselves by taking the most difficult courses possible at their particular school. But they want to see that they are ALREADY fully immersed in college-level classes before they even get to college.

In other words, if your student’s high school doesn’t currently offer any AP or IB course work, make sure they get classes at that level somewhere else (like enrolling in a community college after school).

This shows that they will be able to handle the work-load once they get in to a highly competitive school like the Ivy League.  It shows they have the intellect to do well, and sometimes more importantly, can take the pressure.  That kind of “proof” is what makes Ivy League admissions officers happy. Lets your high school student pass the test and be seriously considered.  No AP or IB classes, and they aren’t even a contender.  It’s that important.

#2: Make sure your student has extracurricular activities that are interesting and different:  

By different, I mean something more unique than piano, violin, or swimming.

“Oh no!” you think, “but my student is taking piano, violin and swimming right now, what should I do?!”

Just reassess. These activities are fine if they’re a musical prodigy who intends to major in music, or a budding Olympic medalist or “ranked” athlete… but just in case they’re not, they need to branch out and try to expand into at least one other extracurricular activities that will make them stand out. They need to do something different than what their friends are doing.  They need to show some individuality in how they spend their time. This allows them to look even more unique to the college admissions officers – again, especially when applying to an Ivy League, or “Ivy League equivalent” college like Stanford, or MIT.

Schools like to diversify their class, and they like students who have done, or are doing, incredibly interesting things.  So, have them branch out!  Do something different, on top of, or in addition to, the regular “smart kid” activities like classical piano, school government, or Model UN.

You don’t want to just have them do what every other smart kid does: ESPECIALLY for the Ivy League. If they don’t stand out, they won’t be seen. Again, it is that important.

#3: Let your student choose their own, real interests

Really.  This one is important. Don’t push your kid to go into engineering or finance as a potential major in college if they’re sincerely telling you they just want to study Greek literature, or get a Ph.D in microbiology.

College admissions officers want to know what REALLY interests your student, again, this is especially true for the Ivy League.

What they don’t want to see is a child who’s been programmed by their parents to say something that simply sounds like a trendy thing to study right now, or with the only purpose being to set your student up for a well-paying job. The Ivy League looks for kids who are interested and curious about learning, not trying to position themselves so they can eventually make the most money possible.  They want people who value intellectual curiosity.

The Ivy League schools in particular like to admit students who want to study something DIFFERENT.

Remember, they employ a lot of professors, and they need to fill those Greek classes, too.  The Ivy League colleges often admit students who have a WIDE VARIETY OF INTERESTS, especially in the humanities.

These are the students who might later go on to law school, or medical school, enter a policy program in foreign relations, and/or get their Ph.D.

Again, the Ivy League colleges in particular like students who appreciate the value of a broad education — one that will leave them post-graduation with a full and solid understanding of today’s world.

In other words, the Ivy League is more interested in graduating students who will always be “well-educated”. They can speak on a wide variety of interests and topics at some depth.

What they are NOT interested in, are people who are simply looking at college as a way to get a job.  They try to weed those “non-intellectuals” the “non-scholars” out.  Those students served better at a state school or highly competitive science or engineering schools like Cal Tech or MIT.

#4: In summary, Ivy League colleges are for students who appreciate learning… about everything!

They are students who have a passion for new things and intellectual topics. They understand and are well-versed in a wide variety of literary, artistic, political, and academic possibilities.

If you can encourage that mindset, your child has a chance to get in.  Strong essays, high grades, good SAT scores, glowing high school recommendations, and a impressive college interview. It will all help complete the college admissions package. But instilling in your student a desire to learn and convey the learning attitude. THAT’s what Ivy League admissions officers look and that is the “secret sauce” that will help them get in!

Check out the rest of my award wining Ivy League college admissions blog for free. Get my new IVY LEAGUE INTERVIEW PREP GUIDE here:

https://ivycollegeessay.com/interview-prep-ivy-league-colllege-admissions/

[I’m a former Harvard admissions interviewer and a Harvard graduate, and currently run the Ivy League college admissions consulting firm: www.IVY COLLEGE ESSAY.com  Contact me for a free consultation today, and get into the Ivy League college of your dreams! 

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16 08, 2022

How To Get Into Harvard

By |2022-09-14T10:21:50-04:00August 16th, 2022|Harvard, Ivy League, Ivy League Advice, Ivy League College, The Harvard Admissions Interview|7 Comments

How to Get Into Harvard

How to get into Harvard — smart people want to know!  Actually, everybody wants to know, because getting into Harvard is a life-changing event.  It gives you opportunity in life.  It gives you a community of equally smart and interesting peers whom you will be able to fall back on, as part of a very tight community, for the rest of your life.

The high school seniors who attend Harvard today become the very well-known, authors, scientists, politicians, Presidents, humanitarians, doctors, scholars and artists of tomorrow.  They truly are the voice of the next generation.

So, what does it take to really get in to Harvard University? How do these successful college applicants do it?

You can try to substitute Princeton, Yale, Dartmouth, or Brown, etc., here, but it’s somehow not the same.  Even Stanford and MIT while excellent, extremely competitive schools (and, in some cases, even better for what you may specifically want to study) still doesn’t quite equate to that Harvard degree.

What is it then about Harvard University?  How do you become one of the lucky 1600 students admitted each year to not only the Ivy League, but “the” Ivy League?

As a former Harvard admissions interviewer and a Harvard graduate myself, allow me to provide some tips and advice.  In my overall experience, not only interviewing for Harvard’s incoming class for the College of Arts & Sciences, but also running my own Ivy League admissions consulting firm for the last 15 years, these are the top things you need to check off, if you’re even going to be seriously considered for that Harvard acceptance letter.

The points are, as follows”

  1. High School GPA
  2. High SAT / ACT scores
  3. Showing how you are UNIQUE + DIFFERENT in your interests, education, experience, achievements, creative work, or hobbies.
  4. Being able to communicate this well in your Harvard admissions essays.
  5. Having an excellent college interview
  6. Providing additional material with your application, when appropriate, like a portfolio of creative work,  that supports all of the above
  7. Great teacher recommendations

And that’s really the key!  The secret sauce.  The map to TREASURE.

I’m going to now go through, in much more detail, all of the above mentioned steps so you fully understand what Harvard actually looks for in an undergraduate applicant, and then, in terms of better understanding how to get in to Harvard, you’ll be able to adjust what’s in your power to control, and then just try not to think about the rest!

  1. Your GPA –  it obviously needs to be high.  Really high.  That doesn’t mean that if you have a fews “B’s” on your transcript that you still can’t get in.  You can.  Everyone who gets accepted to Harvard doesn’t have a 4.0.  Really. What this does mean though is that the higher your grades the more you’re showing the admissions committee that you belong at their school.  In other words, don’t give them a reason to say no.
  2. Your SAT/ACT scores  – I know, I know, “but everyplace says it’s optional now!”  It is.  That’s not incorrect — BUT, a high SAT or ACT score will still help you, and a REALLY HIGH SAT or ACT score will help you even more.  It adds to the same thing I said above: show them you belong at the school. Take the test if you think you can do well.  For all others, optional (but then you may not get in).
  3.  Showing how you are UNIQUE + DIFFERENT in your interests, education, experience, achievements, creative work, or hobbies.

    This is the most important point in my entire list.  This is everything in terms of the Harvard application (and hold true for really any of the highly competitive schools). What makes you unique?  What makes you different from the girl you sit next to in AP Calculus or Lit?  If you want to get into Harvard you MUST find something in your academic interests, experience, background, talent, skills, or philosophies that make you DIFFERENT.

  4. Your Harvard Admissions Essays:

    This, too, is everything.  Your essays have to be well-written, and your topic choice for your Common App is going to be incredibly important, if not the most important choice you make.  I’m linking to a recent blog post on my Ivy League College Admissions Blog that talks about how to make sure your Common App topic is GOOD, as the choice is that important (and same goes for supplementals and any short answer questions): How to Choose A Topic For Your Common App

  5. Your Harvard Interview

    Also incredibly important.  The two tips I’ll give you here are 1). That you need to prepare by going over some possible interview questions, and 2) You need to keep your interview as “conversational” as possible.  In other words, relax and try to have a normal conversation.  The best interviews just flow naturally.

  6. Additional Material  

    This means if there’s an optional essay, you take the opportunity and answer it.  This also means that if you have any creative or academic material at all (like a scientific paper) you submit it here.  Too many students leave this section blank.  Guess who doesn’t?  The students who get in.  Every question, even the ones not officially “required” are all opportunities to tell the admissions committee more about who you are.  Again, take all opportunities.

  7. Teacher Recs

    This falls in the category of things you can’t fully control, but you obviously need to ask for recs from the teachers whom you at least THINK know you well, and will write you a good one.  Teacher recs are more important than people realize, and the students who tend to get into Harvard usually have at least one teacher who puts their own reputation on the line by saying that a student is truly “one of the best they’ve ever taught, in all the years I’ve been teaching.”

Sentences like that actually do get the admissions committee’s attention, though if everything else in your Harvard application isn’t stellar, then it won’t get you what you need.

So, I hope that sheds some good light on what you need to get into Harvard, and this information holds true really for all of the top Ivy League schools.  The most important thing I’ve said here is that Harvard is looking for those who are the voice of the next generation.  They’re looking for the next leaders, writers, scholars, doctors, scientists, and artists in their field.

Show them that’s you, and Harvard will be lucky to have YOU.

For more free tips and advice, check out my award-winning Ivy League Admissions Consulting Blog

And don’t hesitate to reach out to me over social media or my website: IvyCollegeEssay.com

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[I’m a former Harvard admissions interviewer + Harvard grad, and currently run the Ivy League college admissions consulting firm Ivy League Essay. Contact me today for a free consultation about your Ivy League strategy, and get into the Harvard of your dreams!]

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Website:  www.IvyCollegeEssay.com

Phone:  (212) 671-0891

 

 

14 08, 2022

What Each Ivy League College is Known For

By |2024-01-20T11:38:54-05:00August 14th, 2022|Brown, college, College Admissions, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Ivy League, Ivy League Advice, Ivy League College, Princeton, UPenn, Yale|0 Comments

WHAT EACH IVY LEAGUE COLLEGE IS KNOWN FOR

Each Ivy League college has its own niche. It’s own “brand”

In other words, what each Ivy League college is known for in terms of reputation.  In terms of college admissions, and Ivy League college admissions in particular, understanding which school is the best fit for you, as well as which school will think you’re the best fit for THEM, is only going to increase your chances.

The following is a very brief list detailing each Ivy League school and what specific programs or majors it is best known for around the world.

Allow me to add, that all 8 of the Ivy League colleges mentioned here, as well as the ones I deem “Ivy League competitive”  are excellent universities, and truly do offer an extensive, wide-reaching, liberal arts education that will leave you extremely well-educated and intellectually valued around the globe.

And yet, knowing what each Ivy is known for, will give you an advantage when applying to universities.  It is 100% correct to say that some of the schools are known for certain specialties more so than the others, and if you pay attention to that fact, you will have a better chance of getting that acceptance letter, as well as finding a better intellectual  and cultural fit.

And so, without further adieu…

WHAT EACH IVY LEAGUE COLLEGE IS KNOWN FOR:


1. Yale: known for turning out dramatists, poets, and CIA officers (government and international relations).


2. Harvard  is Harvard (also strong in government, engineering, philosophy, languages)

3. Princeton: known for mathematics and physics (Einstein used to teach there).

4. Brown: known for creativity and artist types (including poets, writers and playwrights)

5. UPenn: known for the Wharton school and hence, business and finance.

6. Cornell: known as one of the easier Ivy League colleges to get into and has a strong business and hospitality school link via its grad program.

7. Columbia: known for literature, religion, psychology, languages, politics, NY intellectuals and its proximity to Wall Street.

8. Dartmouth: known for liberal arts majors, as well as those wanting to get into the Tuck school of business post-graduation.

The “Ivy Equivalents”

Furthermore, as mentioned above, there are also “Ivy-like” schools, or “The Ivy Equivalents” in terms of a schools’ level of difficulty, reputation and competitiveness. Here I include schools like:
  1. MIT (obviously known for science, math, STEM, computer science  and engineering),
  2. Stanford (look up it’s proximity to Silicon Valley and it’s niche for business),
  3. Duke (famous for its medical school, so therefore pre-med)
  4. Johns Hopkins (again, famous for their medical school and thereby pre-med programs).

And, there you have it!  Just a sample list of the 8 Ivy League colleges and 4 “Ivy Equivalents” that tell you which university you might want to target if you’re looking at the Ivy League for this coming admissions cycle.

Understanding what I’ve mentioned here, and tailoring your applications appropriately when making you school selection list, and especially when choosing which school to apply for Early Decision, can truly make a difference.

Need more admissions tips and advice?  Check out my award-winning Ivy League college admissions blog for more on how to get in to the Ivy League.

If you’re thinking about Early Decision (you should be!)  then you may also like my articles:

You can also join my Ivy League college discussion group on Reddit at: https://www.reddit.com/r/ivyleaguecollege/

Or, check out colleges organized by state, like this article here:

New York City Colleges

I’m a former Harvard admissions interviewer and a Harvard graduate and currently run the Ivy League college admissions firm: www.IvyCollegeEssay.com.  Contact me today for a free phone consultation, and get into the school of your dreams!

22 10, 2021

Ivy League Early Decision?

By |2022-10-04T10:50:11-04:00October 22nd, 2021|Brown, College Admissions, Columbia, Common App, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Ivy League, The Harvard Admissions Interview, Yale|0 Comments

Ivy League Early Decision: Nov 1 Deadline!

Ivy League Early Decision applications are due Nov 1.

With only one week left, what can you do to make sure your college admissions essays are in the best state possible to secure your chances of getting into the Ivy League?  Read on for the “Top Ten” tips for Early Decision from a former Harvard Interviewer:

 

  1. Early Decision Tip #1: Only submit your best work. Yes, early decision will help you, but if you’re struggling to finish your college admissions essays on time, just to get in by the deadline, and as a result are submitting sub-par, or what you know is not your best work, it is better to WAIT and submit regular decision, than get rejected now because you ran out of time.

 

  1. Early Decision Tip #2: Make sure you’ve chosen the best school for your early decision (or early action) pick! I usually tell my students who work with me via my Ivy League College Admissions Consulting service, that you want to pick the most difficult school on your list for early decision, because it will give you a slight (slight! as in many 5-10%) boost to your chances, BUT you don’t want to “waste” your decision if you truly, truly, don’t have a fighting chance of being competitive for the school.

 

That means if you know your GPA isn’t stellar, or maybe your SAT score isn’t what would normally be considered “solid” or “high” then your chances of getting into Harvard, or Princeton University are going to be way less, and you need to carefully rethink your decision, and you would be missing out on getting in to Columbia University, for example, or UPenn, or Cornell = all Ivy League schools, and extremely competitive, but sometimes slightly easier to get into than Harvard, Stanford, or Princeton.

 

My caveat?  Choose wisely.

 

  1. Early Decision Tip #3: Ok, and now for the actual essay tips — DO NOT REPEAT YOURSELF IN YOUR ADMISSIONS ESSAYS! Repeating yourself is one of the seven deadly sins of college applications. Then Each essay is an opportunity to reveal a different side of yourself.  Don’t waste that opportunity to reiterate something you already talked about somewhere else and It will count against you.

 

  1. Early Decision Tip #4: If you’re a legacy SAY IT. I know in this day and age we all like to think that everything is above board and equal, but the truth is, the Ivy League schools still value legacy. That means if your mom or dad went to Harvard, as with your Early Decision choice, it will give you a slight boost.  However, for all those who are not legacy, that doesn’t mean you’re out of the running.  It doesn’t even mean you’ll be looked over in favor of someone who is — it just means that if you have a family member who graduated from the school, also take advantage of the “boost” and make sure you say it within one of the essays, and not just on the application.

 

  1. Early Decision Tip #5: As with the above, if you are ranked nationally as an athlete in any sport, SAY IT. I’m surprised how many students have very significant achievements in all kinds of athletics, but, because they are not being actively recruited, think this just doesn’t matter. It matters.  As with everything else above, it will give you a “boost.”  You want the boost.

 

  1. Early Decision Tip #6: Make sure you are choosing the strongest topic for your Common App essay! The Common App essay, as all of you reading this know, is THE most important part of your college application after your grades + SAT / ACT. You better make sure you have chosen the best topic for you.  The most common mistake I see with my students, over and over again, is choosing a weak topic.  If you’re not sure and if your topic is weak or not, seek out someone like me, and I will be happy to tell you.  As you can see in the link below, I offer free consultations.  Did you hear that?  That’s FREE.

 

  1. Early Decision Tip #7: Always take advantage of any “additional information” essay and do it. Each essay, again, is an opportunity to show a different side of yourself. Why would you not take this opportunity and, tell the admissions committee even more?

 

  1. Early Decision Tip #8: The Ivy League schools want to see how sophisticated you are in your tastes. In other words, cultured. That means that supplemental questions, or questions on the Common App application itself that ask you to list books or TV shows, should be filled in with books and shows that are more intellectual in nature.  That’s what they’re looking for! If your whole list fills with pop culture teenage nonsense then you should think twice. The list is really a trick question Or Have doubts if your lists pass the test? Ask me.

 

  1. Early Decision Tip #9: Use your supplemental essays to show the admissions committee and what makes you unique. You want to use the essays as an opportunity to again showcase the most unique and interesting aspects of yourself. “Interesting” is the key word and also think about something you do. Or participate in what makes you different than your peers. Or is it something you have achieved at a very high level?

 

 

  1. Early Decision Tip #10: The order of your “Activities List” on the Common App matters! Again, you want to put the MOST INTERESTING activity at the top. Not necessarily but the thing you spend the most time doing and Remember, everything about your college application. Especially, if you are applying to the Ivy League (or Ivy League competitive schools) that is about showing the admissions committee who you are, as well as, why admitting you to their very select class, and, will only make their class better.

 

Good luck, and reach out to me if you’re looking for more bespoke Ivy League college admissions support or advice.  Thinking of transferring?  Check out my blog post here: Transferring to the Ivy League?

I’m a former Harvard admissions interviewer and Harvard grad, and run my Ivy League College Admissions Essay Consulting firm: www.IvyCollegeEssay.com out of NYC,  and work with students all over the world.  Contact me today for a free consultation, and get into the Ivy League!

*Interested in getting your MBA degree and want to go to a top business school? www.MBAIvy.com

24 08, 2021

SAT vs ACT: What’s the difference? Which should I take?

By |2022-10-02T13:34:15-04:00August 24th, 2021|College Admissions, Common App, Harvard, Ivy League, Yale|0 Comments

Previously, there was never a question as to which one to take, most high school students took both. But now things are a little different with some colleges adopting test-optional or test-blind policies. Test-optional means the college doesn’t require testing but will take your scores into account if you submit them. Test-blind means that standardized tests such as the ACT and/or SAT will not even be considered during the admissions process.

It’s important to know what the policies are for the Ivy Leagues or elite Top 20 universities that are on your list. It’s good to check periodically because right now policies are changing daily! Many of the Ivy League schools currently have test-optional policies for now. But don’t overlook that it can only help your application if you study hard and get great scores on the SAT/ACT to submit!

The SAT and the ACT share quite a bit similarities – both tests have optional essays, math sections, reading comprehension sections, grammar sections. The essays for both are different, not harder or easier but just different. The ACT also does focus on slightly more complex math problems. It has a science section which is related to graphs and charts. The ACT is much more fast-paced. It can add to the stress if you can’t remained on task and focused during the test.

In order to gauge which one you think you would do best on. Buy or check out the latest official testing booklets for each. That alone may convince you which one makes the most sense. You can also take free practice exams online to see if that changes your mind.

Testing can be very stressful but remember that your application is made up of much more than standardized test scores. Make sure you continue to challenge yourself in your High School classes and maintain a stellar GPA. I can help you with showcasing yourself in the best light at the colleges. These are mostly in line with you as a whole person.

Reach out now for a free consultation at: www.IvyCollegeEssay.com and let me help you achieve your dream of getting into a great top college or the Ivy League! Also check out my Blog that is full of helpful information, including Things You Can Do to Boost Your Ivy League Application!.

21 01, 2020

Transferring to an Ivy League College

By |2022-09-15T23:58:12-04:00January 21st, 2020|Brown, College Admissions, Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Ivy League, Ivy League Advice, Transferring, Yale|3 Comments

Transferring to an Ivy League College? It’s Easier Than You Think!

Getting in to Harvard, Princeton, Columbia, Brown, or any of the Ivy League schools might just be easier than you think…

Though most of my Ivy League college admissions consulting blog centers around high school seniors applying to the most competitive universities in the US, every year I also work with students who are already in college, and are thinking about transferring to the Ivy League.

Did you hear that correctly?  YES, YOU CAN GET INTO AN IVY LEAGUE COLLEGE like Harvard, Princeton, Yale, Columbia, and more…by transferring.

And, I’ll tell you another secret:  it’s easier to get in than regular college admissions.

Each year, I get students into some of the top colleges in the country: as transfers.

Now, don’t get me wrong, you need to do really well your first semester. The better your grades, the better your chances. That said, I have had students who were rejected from Harvard (for example) — as in, not even deferred when they applied Early Decision. Not even waitlisted. Students who ended up going to not another Ivy League college, but an “easier” or mid-level college.

In other words,  a school that is not even IN the Ivy League. Schools like NYU, Boston College, Emory, any of the “Seven Sister” schools, or even schools like Georgia Tech). These students ended up applying as transfers to Harvard and actually GETTING IN.

The theory is, since there are WAY less transfer applicants than regular freshman high school applicants each year, if you have done well your first semester at your college of choice, you actually have a really good shot.

In other words, if you need that spelled out — it’s easier to get in to the Ivy League, and the Ivy League’s top schools (Princeton, Harvard, Yale) as a transfer student.

You need to have good grades, and you need to have decent test scores, but the Ivy League colleges are more interested in how you did your first semester, than anything you did in high school (including your SAT scores).

I have gotten kids in as transfer students to Harvard, who absolutely would have been passed over and rejected if they applied the previous year while they were high school seniors.

How you present yourself as a transfer applicant though, is very important.  You need to think about how you want to craft your story, your narrative.  You need to think about your reasons for wanting to transfer to an Ivy League college.

You’ll also be leaving your first school behind — any friends you’ve made, etc.  Most of all though, you need to craft that narrative in a way that will sound like a valid reason for transferring to the school.

And getting straight A’s your first semester doesn’t hurt.

If you’re interested in learning more about how to transfer into an Ivy League college, and not just give up on your dreams, please contact me today for a free consultation.

Transfer applications are due March 1.  I’m working with all kinds of college transfer students now.  Don’t think that it isn’t possible to transfer into Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Dartmouth, Columbia, Brown, UPenn, or Cornell because it is.

If you’re not thrilled by the school you got into, if you got rejected from the Ivy League either Early Decision or regular admissions, know that it is STILL possible.

You just need a strategy and a plan, and that’s exactly what I do.  Contact me today for a free consultation!   www.IvyCollegeEssay.com

See you in the Ivy League!

Check out some of my other Ivy League admissions consulting posts here, like: The Parent’s Guide to Getting Your Student Into the Ivy League

I’m a former Harvard admissions interviewer + Harvard grad, and currently run the  Ivy League college admissions firm: www.IvyCollegeEssay.com . Contact me today for a free consultation, and get in to the school of your dreams!]

Rather listen to the article?  Click here to watch the video!

19 01, 2020

Your College Admissions Interview

By |2022-09-17T14:43:32-04:00January 19th, 2020|College Admissions, Harvard, Ivy League, The Harvard Admissions Interview|2 Comments

The College Admissions Interview

How to Prepare for your Ivy League interview as well as any other college or university!

Hello Ivy League college applicants! This is one of my most important Ivy League college admissions blog posts of the admissions cycle, and we’re going to touch on everything!

First things first, your college admissions interview, and specifically, your Ivy League interviews — especially if you are applying Early Decision, are quickly approaching!

The question now is:  how to best prepare?

You spent so much time on your college applications, not to mention all the years and years of your life trying to do well in high school, and amassing the right extracurriculars, plus trying to get your SAT and ACT test scores high, and doing interesting and unique things with your outside school time, and your summers, and your mind, and your personality, just so you can GET INTO A GREAT IVY LEAGUE COLLEGE.

In other words: don’t blow it now.

There is too much at stake.

So, what can you do to not blow your college admissions interview, no matter where you’re applying?  Educate yourself!

Know what to EXPECT from the interview process, and you’ll be so way ahead of the game!

To help out students who worked with me on their Ivy League admissions essays this year, as well as help out those students just finding my Ivy League blog now for the first time, I’ve put together an “Ivy League College Admissions Interview Prep ebook” for only $20 USD, that will expertly guide you through the entire regular college + Ivy League interview process.

You can get the downloadable ebook here today.  It’s small, but has everything you really need to know.

Seriously, don’t go into your college interview without being prepared.  My ebook is filled with EXPERT tips and advice on everything you can expect, from how to dress, to specific questions asked, and how you should best respond. I am a former Harvard admissions interviewer, as well as a Harvard graduate, and this is some of the best insider advice you can get.  

BUY EBOOK HERE

I am also offering this year, as my schedule allows, an 1 hour MOCK INTERVIEW Prep.  This “mock” or practice interview will walk you through what an exact Harvard (or Ivy League university equivalent) college admissions interview will be like before it’s actually real.

So, don’t think the interview doesn’t matter, because it does matter: A LOT.  An awful lot, and this is especially true if you’ve been deferred from Early Admissions/Early Decision.

Meanwhile, check out my ebook above, and GET INTO THE IVY LEAGUE!

[I’m a former Harvard admissions interviewer, and a Harvard grad and currently run the top college admissions consulting firm: Ivy League Essay (www.IvyCollegeEssay) out of NYC.  Working with student all over the world, I help the best of the best achieve their dreams and get into Harvard and like-minded Ivy League universities. 

Contact me today, for a free consultation: www.IvyCollegeEssay.com 

For more Ivy League college admissions advice + tips, check out my article, here: How to Get into Harvard

16 12, 2019

Rejected Early Decision? Ivy League College Admission Help

By |2022-10-04T10:09:44-04:00December 16th, 2019|Brown, College Admissions, Columbia, Common App, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, Ivy League, Yale|0 Comments

A lot of students this week rejected from their early decision (ED) schools, and the heartbreak is horrible. Maybe it was a “reach” school, maybe it was Princeton or Harvard or Brown University, or maybe you just really, really wanted to go there from the time you were 8.

Getting rejected from your first choice college though, doesn’t mean you can’t still get in to a really good school — To make sure you don’t make the same mistake TWICE that you want to take a serious look (or have someone like me) at your previous application and essays.

Often, the essays are the reason people rejected from their Early Decision schools. When everything else in their application (their stats, SAT scores, grades, extracurriculars, rec letters, etc) are stellar and up to par.  It comes down to the writing, and more specifically.

This is good news and bad news.  The good news is, you can change or revise your essay now. Before you submit to your other schools and make the same mistake twice.  The bad news is, you have to be confident enough to know that maybe you don’t know how an essay really “reads” via the college’s admission office, and you should seek out someone who does know how things work, so pure pride and “but I liked my essay” doesn’t get in your own way.

I will repeat myself: most often, when everything else in a student’s background is “good” or even “excellent”. At the level, it needs the school targeted. The reason for the college’s Early Decision rejection is The Common App Essay.

So, my one piece of advice to any of you who just rejected by your Early Decision school. And are now maybe panicking a little as you apply to your other schools. If you have the resources, take the time to reach out and have someone like myself (a former Harvard admissions interviewer + Harvard grad) look over your “rejected” Early Decisions application. And tell you what you need to do or change.

A huge number of my students go on to get in to ALL of their other schools.  The worst thing you can do if you rejected my friends, is nothing.  If it didn’t work the first time, something needs to change.  My advice = figure out what that is.

An Early Decision rejection is a warning shot.  Heed it, and make the changes.  Otherwise, you’re only throwing the same dart at the college. Or even Ivy League college board, and just hoping it will stick.

[I’m a former Harvard interviewer and Harvard grad, and currently run the top Ivy League College Admissions Firm: www.IvyCollegeEssay.com out of Manhattan.  I work with the top students all over the world.  Contact me today for a free consultation, and get into the school of your dreams!]

 

 

 

2 12, 2019

The Ivy League College Admissions Essay That Will Get You Into Harvard

By |2023-08-24T17:37:32-04:00December 2nd, 2019|College Admissions, Common App, Harvard, Ivy League|1 Comment

The Ivy League College Admissions Essay Examples That Will Get You Into Harvard

This is a strong example of a successful Harvard admissions essay, and I will be posting examples this week of admission College Essay Examples from other Ivy League schools like Princeton, Yale, Columbia and Brown, that got people in.

The College Essay Ivy League was written by a student named Calvin Heiman, to give credit where credit is due.  However, as a former Harvard admissions interviewer, had this come across my desk while I was interviewing for the university (and if everything else in his application was super strong) he would have gotten my recommendation to admit.

Here is his Common App Essay in its entirety. It has everything I was trained by Harvard admissions to look for: originality, personal emotion, serious challenge, and adversity. Yet his positive outlook comes through, and he creates a great, and thoughtful. The somewhat whimsical conclusion at the end ties everything together. In other words, he paints a great picture with words.

More so, his Common App essay really gives us a sense of who this person is: what he values, the tastes and flavors of his world (literally), and once again, his positive outlook, despite real, serious hardship going on in his family.

And now for the essay, so you can see a prime example of what a strong essay looks like. If you’re trying to get in to an Ivy League college this year.  Here it is!

I love pasta.

I’m not Italian, nor do I know anyone who is. I’m a half-Polish, half-German kid from Boulder, Colorado. I should instead crave perogies, wienerschnitzel, or maybe vegan avocado toast sprinkled with microgreens.

So why exactly do I love pasta? Memories.

When I was seven, my favorite restaurant, Noodles, had mac-n-cheese that was legendary. However, it played second fiddle to Pasta Fresca. My little secret that hid down on the bottom right of the menu. I would order it every time, exactly the same: extra tomatoes, half spinach, double feta. Perfection.

But with my insatiable desire for perfection, came complications; it was impossible for a seven-year-old to routinely find his way to Noodles, come up with $8.50, and convince the cashier that No, I am not lost, and Yes, I know the feta will cost extra. Therefore, I had to get creative. Armed with a to-go menu and one brief shopping trip later, I attempted to make Pasta Fresca. I unfortunately learned, however, that an ingredient list alone contains no indication of measurement; a teaspoon quickly turns into a tablespoon. The result was a soupy, vinegary mess. That magic touch, that fresca, was missing. In fact, calling it Pasta Fresca would’ve been a crime. 

Five years later, that warm glow of pride of my foray into Pasta Fresca was long gone. I had hit rock bottom. It was winter and I was living with my best friend. Sledding, snowball fights, and hot cocoa filled our days. So, how does a twelve-year-old living his dream hit rock bottom?

Cancer.

My brother Klaus was diagnosed with a rare form of childhood sarcoma that forced my family to New York City for treatment, while I was stuck in cold Colorado. Days bled into weeks, weeks into months of simply grinding away at school, craving the comfort of sleep, where I could forget my anxiety for a while. My sole comfort, the one thing that turned the worst of weeks into something bearable, was Gruffalo Pasta.

Contrary to the name, it contained no mythical beast; it was simply penne with meat sauce, and yet there was something magical about it. Every Friday night, my friend’s family and I would sit down and eat Gruffalo Pasta with their famous garlic cheesy bread (worthy of its own essay). Laughs rang out as we played games, watched movies, and went sledding–we would be a family. Although my real family was thousands of miles away, every Friday night, home felt tangible.

When my family returned, spring gave way to summer, and with it came neverending afternoons of skinned knees, balls lost over fences, new neighborhood friends, and Mac n’ Cheese. We ripped through box after box, new faces cycling through the kitchen as mac n’ cheese lunches became a neighborhood tradition. There was a sense of independence that came with it, as us kids cooked it ourselves–exactly how we liked it. We added extra butter and milk, peas, chicken, bacon; whatever our little hearts desired. The days seemed infinite, brimming with possibility and spontaneity, with the comfort that there was always a mac n’ cheese lunch at someone’s house to look forward to.

Pasta continues to weave its thread through my life, from the Christmas dinners of Pasta Puttanesca, my pesto business started in 8th grade, gifts of exotic pasta and sauces for my birthday, to the cross-country team’s pasta parties. Pasta is a narrative tightly intertwin. It’s for good in the world. Whether it be memories, hope for the future, or simple joys, find that good that drives your every day. I say you need look no further than what is in front of you. I found that goodness in a bowl of pasta.

So, to conclude, this essay is solid. Of course his supplemental essays would also have to be equally solid. And show different and unique alternative sides of his experience and personality. But in terms of just looking at a strong Common App essay, it’s a good example.

I will be posting successful essays from each Ivy League college over the next few weeks, so you can see what works (and maybe what doesn’t), so subscribe to my blog, or follow my Ivy League subreddit on Reddit https://www.reddit.com/r/ivyleaguecollege/  and stay tuned!

Applying to college this year?  I’m a former Harvard admissions interviewer + Harvard grad, and run the award-winning Ivy League college admission consulting firm: www.IvyCollegeEssay.com Contact me today for a free consultation, and get into the school of your dreams!]

Are you a parent looking for Ivy League college help?  Check out my blog article here, especially for parents!: https://ivycollegeessay.com/2015/05/31/how-to-prepare-your-kids-for-an-ivy-league-college-education/

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